Lung Cancer Screening for High Risk Individuals

The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) approved annual screening with low-dose CT for individuals at high risk for lung cancer.

The task force recommended annual scans for adults aged 55 to 80 who have a smoking history of 30 pack-years (= 1pack/day for 30 years, 2 packs/day for 15 years) and who currently smoke or who have quit within the past 15 years and who have no symptoms of lung cancer.

The recommendations are in large part based on the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) in the United States, which compared lung cancer screening methods (chest xray vs. CT scans) in current and former smokers. The results showed that people who received low-dose CT scans had a lower risk of dying from lung cancer than people who received standard chest X-rays.

The USPSTF’s recommendation is on par with previous recommendations for screening for breast, colon and cervical cancers – for which survival has increased dramatically following wide-spread screening programs. it is felt that the adoption of CT screening for lung cancer will have a “moderate-to-substantial benefit” in reducing mortality in high-risk individuals.

According to the Canadian Cancer Society, Lung Cancer is the second-most frequently diagnosed cancer (after skin cancer) in Canada, and is the leading cause of cancer death in Canadians. Approximately 1 in 11 men, and 1 in 15 women will be diagnosed with lung cancer during their lifetime.

Canada Diagnostic has been providing low-dose CT screening exams for lung cancer since 2002. We also provide screening exams for colon cancer, coronary artery disease and carotid artery disease. If you think that a screening exam might be right for you, talk to your doctor. We would be happy to tell you more about these screening exams – you can call us at 604-709-8522 or visit our Screening Exam webpage here.

  Filed under: Categories: Atherosclerosis, CT Scans, Early Detection, Lung Cancer, and Screening Exams. Tags: CT Scans, early detection, Lung Cancer Screening, and screening.
  Comments: None