MRI Scans

Frozen Shoulder – What is it? How do you fix it?

The medical term is adhesive capsulitis, and if you’ve ever suffered with frozen shoulder, you know how painful and frustrating it can be. Your pain may even worsen at night, disrupting your sleep.

Frozen shoulder can go through three stages: Freezing where it gets stiffer over time, Frozen where your range of motion is quite limited and Thawing where your frozen shoulder starts regaining its range. The whole process can take a couple of years!

What’s actually happening is that the structures that make up your shouder are encased in a capsule of connective tissue that tightens around the shoulder. Risk factors include being over age 40, having reduced arm mobility due to other factors (broken arm, arthritis) and some chronic health conditions like diabetes.

What can you do about frozen shoulder? See your doctor who can confirm the diagnosis. Then try a conservative approach with over-the-counter pain medication and physical therapy. If those just aren’t helping, you can talk to your doctor about having an image-guided injection.

A special type of image-guided injection called hydrodilatation–where sterile water is injected into the shoulder joint and stretches the capsule–gives instant and permanent relief of the dreaded frozen shoulder. Sometimes hydrodilatation is the therapy of choice for active people who want to get back to their favourite activities as soon as possible.

Call us at 604-709-8522 or email us at info@canadadiagnostic.com  to learn more about hydrodilatation at our clinic or any of our other image-guided injections for pain relief.

  Filed under: Categories: injections, MRI Scans, MSK, News, Orthopedic, pain management, Sport Medicine, Sports Injuries, therapeutic injections, and Ultrasound Scans. Tags: BC, frozen shoulder, hydrodilatation, MRI Vancouver, pain injection, shoulder pain, and Vancouver.
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Primary Care Doctors say Imaging Improves Patient Care

Do we use too much medical imaging? Not according to primary care doctors in a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

The study surveyed 500 primary care doctors in the U.S. – 88% of the physicians surveyed said that diagnostic imaging allows them to be more confident in their diagnoses and to make better clinical decisions. All that equals better patient care in their books.

In both the United States and Canada, medical imaging is viewed as a costly component of the healthcare system and ways to cut those costs are being explored. Practical guidelines have been developed both in Canada and the U.S. to help doctors choose the most appropriate type of imaging for their patients’ particular symptoms. The goal of these guidelines is to help eliminate unnecessary or redundant testing.

At Canada Diagnostic, we are able to offer MRI, CT and Ultrasound so that you can get the best test possible for your unique needs. Our radiologists are available to speak with your doctors anytime to help determine what the best test is. Each type of test provides a different type of information, so its important to choose the best one for diagnostic accuracy.

Find out how we can help – call us today at 604-709-8522 or email us at info@canadadiagnostic.com

  Filed under: Categories: Atherosclerosis, Brain Scans, Brain Scans, Breast Cancer, Cardiovascular, Colon Cancer, CT Scans, Early Detection, hcPRP, Heart Disease, injections, Knee, Knee, Lung Cancer, MRI Scans, Multiple Sclerosis, Orthopedic, pain management, PRP, PRP, Sport Medicine, Sports Injuries, therapeutic injections, and Ultrasound Scans. Tags: CT, CT scan, diagnostic imaging, MRI, MRI scan, Private MRI Vancouver, and ultrasound.
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Our radiologists’ research featured at international conference

The Radiological Society of North America (“RSNA”) is holding its annual international conference in Chicago this week.  Canada Diagnostic Centres is very proud that three of our radiologists have research that is being presented at this high-profile conference.

The RSNA Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting has 53,000 attendees from around the world.  The Scientific Assembly is considered the premiere scientific radiology forum in the world – providing the most up-to-date and leading edge research into all aspects of radiology.

Drs. Bruce Forster and Gordon Andrews are contributing authors to research posters on musculo-skeletal imaging and improving CT reporting for radiology residents.  Dr. Forster is also moderating and presenting at an educational session on elbow/hand/wrist imaging.

Dr. Hugue Ouellette, our Medical Director is a contributing author to eight research papers which have been accepted for presentation at this year’s Assembly.  His topics include musculo-skeletal imaging and radiology in emergency settings.

Our radiologists’ research was conducted at UBC Hospital and Vancouver General Hospital – facilities where they also work, teach and research.

We’re very proud of the work our radiologists do both at Canada Diagnostic and our local teaching hospitals – and we would like to congratulate them on their contributions to this year’s RSNA Scientific Assembly.

If you are considering a private MRI, CT or Ultrasound exam, we would be happy to help.  To learn more about our services, please visit our website or call us at 1-877-709-8522.

  Filed under: Categories: CDC News, CT Scans, MRI Scans, MSK, Orthopedic, and Sport Medicine. Tags: Canada Diagnostic Vancouver, MRI, MRI Vancouver, Private CT, Private CT Scan Vancouver, Private MRI, and sport medicine.
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Heading Soccer ball leads to brain injury

According to a study published June 11 in the journal Radiology, soccer players who frequently use their heads to field the ball have brain abnormalities that show up on MRI and that are similar to those found in people with traumatic brain injury.

Soccer balls can travel as fast as 50 miles per hour, and a player may head the ball up to a dozen times during a game.  During practices, it might be common to perform heading drills – where the ball might be bounced off of a player’s head several dozen times.  During the repeated impacts, the brain is accelerating/decerlating inside the skull.

We already know the effects of multiple concussions and how sports like north-american football are starting to grapple with those effects.  But what about impacts that don’t cause concussion like repetitive heading of a soccer ball?

Testing has shown that cognitive (memory) performance decreased in soccer players after a threshold of 1800 headings per year.  However, the changes seen in the brain on MRI show tissue changes that preceed cognitive decline at thresholds of 900 – 1500 headings per year.  The cumulative effects of repetitive minor injury might not be apparent for many years.

How can this type of cumulative brain injury be avoided?  One of the studies authors suggested that players heading counts be monitored and the players be given a recovery period once a certain number of headings has been reached.  Baseball does something similar with pitchers to save their arms/shoulders from permanent damage.

for more information about MRI, CT and Ultrasound services at Canada Diagnostic, please call us at 1-877-709-8522 or send us an email at info@canadadiagnostic.com.  You can also visit our website at www.canadadiagnostic.com.

  Filed under: Categories: Brain Scans, Brain Scans, CT Scans, Knee, MRI Scans, MSK, Orthopedic, Sport Medicine, and Sports Injuries. Tags: brain mri, head injury, MRI Vancouver, Private MRI Vancouver, and soccer injury.
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CT scans in children – is there an alternate test that can be ordered instead? What do you need to know?

A new study about childhood radiation exposure was presented this week in the British Journal of Medicine.

This excellent study reminds us that CT scans are still exceptional diagnostic tools, but that they are not a one-size-fits-all solution.

Here’s what you need to know:

  1. The increase I childhood cancers from exposure to CT scans is 25%.  That does not mean that one in four children who had had a CT scan will get cancer.  Here is an explanation from the study:But because the incidence of cancer in early life is very low this increased risk translated into only an extra six cancers over 10 years for every 10 000 young people who underwent computed tomography. Had they not had any scans, 39 cases of cancer would have been expected in this group
  2. Technology and reasons for using CT scans have evolved considerably since the study’s data cutoff of 2005.  Today’s scanners all have radiation dose reduction software and scan a very precise area of the body, both of which result in less radiation than previous types of CT scans
  3. The decision to give a CT scan to a child is one doctors make after very careful consideration.  A North American-wide campaign to “Image Gently” has resulted in a big shift in how and when CT scans are performed.  Here is one of the conclusions of the study:

Future CT scans should be limited to situations where there is a definite clinical indication, with every scan optimised to provide a diagnostic CT image at the lowest possible radiation dose.

It is important to note that the effects of radiation exposure in adults is less than that in children. An adult’s overall risk of getting cancer is affected by many things including age, lifestyle habits such as smoking and diet, and genetics. Based on current incidence rates, approximately 4 out of 10 Canadians will develop some type of cancer during their lifetime, regardless of exposure to medical radiation.  Read more here.

CT scans still remain an invaluable diagnostic tool.  For example, in trauma cases, these scans can be performed quickly and can establish what the injuries are – these can be life-and-death cases where time and information is of the essence.

Early detection of lung cancer is another area where CT shines.  See our next blog article where research has shown that CT scans detect twice as many lung cancers as chest xrays.

If you would like more information about CT, MRI or Ultrasound scans, or would like to know which type of scan might be best for you, please call us at 604-709-8522, email us at info@canadadiagnostic.com or visit our website.

  Filed under: Categories: CT Scans and MRI Scans. Tags: CT Scans, MRI Scans Vancouver, and Radiation Exposure.
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Proud to Support Rowing Canada!

Canada Diagnostic Centres is very proud to support Rowing Canada as their Official Supplier of Diagnostic Imaging.  As a leader in sports medicine imaging, our clinic is chosen by professional athletes, elite amateurs and weekend warriors alike!

The rower’s did Canada proud by bringing home the Silver Medal in Men’s and Women’s 8’s at the London2012 Summer Olympics.

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For more information about Rowing Canada, visit:  http://www.rowingcanada.org/home

To find out how Canada Diagnostic can help you with your sport-related injury, call us at 1-877-709-8522, or visit our website at http://www.canadadiagnostic.com/

  Filed under: Categories: CDC News, MRI Scans, MSK, Orthopedic, Sport Medicine, and Sports Injuries. Tags: knee injury, rib strain, Rowing Canada, shoulder injury, sport medicine, and Sports Injuries.
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10 Greatest Medical Inventions of the last 50 years – guess what tied for #1? CT & MRI!

According to healthexecnews.com, CT and MRI tie for the greatest medical inventions of the last 50 years.

The choice of MRI and CT as #1 reflects what an incredible impact these two technologies have made on the medical industry since their inception in the late 1970’s.  MRI and CT seem like standard procedures today, hinting at their significant impact on healthcare.

From screening for early disease detection, to detailed diagnostic scans, to monitoring treatment progress, MRI and CT have a role to play in just about every type of injury and illness.

At Canada Diagnostic in Vancouver, we’ve been offering MRI and CT scans since 2000.

The radiologists who interpret MRI & CT scans at Canada Diagnostic Centres all work, teach and do research at two of BC’s best-known teaching hospitals:  Vancouver General Hospital and UBC Hospital.  What does this mean for our patients and their physicians?  Our radiologists are  at the forefront of the latest developments in advanced diagnostic imaging and read a high volume of specialized cases each year.

Our radiologists also bring a variety of sub-specialty skills to Canada Diagnostic relating to musculoskeletal, neurologic, breast and abdominal diagnostic imaging.  They use a team approach and are able to consult freely with each other in the event of challenging cases.  This depth and breadth of knowledge greatly benefits our patients and their doctors.

To learn more about the types of scans we offer at Canada Diagnostic, click here, or call us at 604-709-8522.

 

 

 

 

 

  Filed under: Categories: Colon Cancer, CT Scans, Lung Cancer, MRI Scans, MSK, Multiple Sclerosis, Orthopedic, and Screening Exams. Tags: CT, diagnostic MRI, early detection, MRI, Private CT Vancouver, Private MRI Vancouver, and screening CT.
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Should you have a Breast MRI before surgery?

That’s a question that many people newly-diagnosed with breast cancer might be asking their surgeon.  Currently, there isn’t definitive data to show whether having a breast MRI before surgery changes a patient’s outcome, so it isn’t easy for your surgeon to give you a definite yes or no to that question.

The debate going on isn’t about whether MRI finds more cancer, but instead, whether it improves diagnostic accuracy and therefore outcomes (such as reducing the number of surgeries or cancer recurrances, and whether survival rates improve).

A study done at Yale University and presented at the Radiological Society of North America’s annual conference in 2011 showed that re-operation rates were dramatically reduced when breast MRI was used.  But that is just one study, and there are others out there that show no difference.

So, why do we do breast MRI?  At Canada Diagnostic, we offer breast MRI as a way for patients and their surgeons to get the clearest picture possible about the size, shape and location of their cancer.  A small percentage of women will have a tiny cancer in their other breast that wasn’t seen on mammography or ultrasound, and a number may have a tumour that is actually larger or more extensive than what was seen on their diagnostic imaging.  This information is helpful when planning surgery (lumpectomy and breast-conserving surgery) and can help reduce the need for a follow-up surgery.    For some patients, the peace of mind that comes from knowing the “full picture” is important.

The role of breast MRI in the management of breast cancer is probably going to start changing in the coming years.  As we learn more and more about the biology of the different types of breast cancer, researchers may begin to develop imaging sequences based on the particular type of tumour the patient has.

If you would like to learn more about breast MRI and whether it might be right for you, call us today at 604-709-8522 or drop us an email at info@canadadiagnostic.com And don’t forget to have your annual mammogram if you are a woman over 40 – its still the best first-line tool we have for finding cancer early.

  Filed under: Categories: Breast Cancer, Breast MRI, and MRI Scans. Tags: breast, breast cancer, breast mri, breast surgery, and early detection.
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Breast MRI helps predict chemo’s effectiveness

MRI that is used to determine how well breast cancer tumours are responding to chemotherapy may help shape patient care.  A new study shows how imaging can play a vital role in characterizing a tumor and monitoring treatment response.

A study done at the University of California (San Francisco) looked at the results of women who had chemotherapy prior to surgery.  They received Breast MRIs before their chemo started, after one round of chemo, after a second round of chemo and again prior to surgery.

Breast MRI proved to be better than clinical examination in accurately showing how well a tumour responded to chemotherapy and how much tumour was remaining.  Researchers found that the best predictive information about how a tumour is responding comes early in treatment–during the MRI done after the first treatment.  This means that doctors can get useful information early on in a patient’s chemotherapy to determine how well its working.  Treatment changes then can be made if necessary.

If you have received a diagnosis of breast cancer, or have had breast cancer in the past, talk to your doctor about having a Breast MRI. 

Breast MRI exams are available at Canada Diagnostic, analyzed by a radiologist with a sub-speciality in breast imaging.  Call us today for more information at 877-709-8522 or email us:  info@canadadiagnostic.com

  Filed under: Categories: Breast Cancer and Breast MRI. Tags: breast cancer, breast mri, Canada Diagnostic Vancouver, CDC Vancouver, and MRI Vancouver.
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Adding MRI or Ultrasound to Mammograms may help discover more cancers

Women with an increased risk of breast cancer AND dense breasts may benefit from adding ultrasounds or MRIs to their annual mammogram screenings.

Researchers from 21 institutions affiliated with the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) found that ultrasounds and MRIs found additional cancers not seen by mammography alone.  The study concluded that supplemental ultrasounds increased cancer detection by an average of 4.3 cancers per 1,000 women per year while MRI further increased cancer detection by an average of 14.7 cancers per 1,000 women per year.

Why doesn’t mammography find these cancers?  One of the lead researchers said that looking for a cancer in a woman with dense breasts via mammography is “like looking for a polar bear in a snowstorm”.  Dense breast tissue looks very white on mammography – and so does cancer.

So who exactly should get supplemental MRI and/or ultrasound?  Women who have dense breasts and more than one risk factor for breast cancer.  Risk factors include a having a known or suspected breast cancer gene mutation, prior radiation therapy to the chest area, prominent family history of breast cancer, prior atypical biopsy and extremely dense breasts.  Its best to review your history and risk factors with your doctor.

To learn more about whether a breast MRI or screening ultrasound is right for you, talk to your doctor or call us for more information any time at 604-709-8522.  Or visit us on the web.

  Filed under: Categories: Breast Cancer, Breast MRI, MRI Scans, and Ultrasound Scans. Tags: breast cancer, breast mri, Mammogram, and ultrasound.
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